Reviews

Triumph Trident 660


We find ourselves in an era where we continuously witness an extremely high rate of motorcycle fatalities.

I would go as far as attributing this misfortune to two primary reasons, lack of rider training, and jumping onto the wrong class of bike, especially as a first-time rider. You may ask yourself “what does this have to do with the motorcycle we are currently profiling”. Well, tag along and I will explain why I have gained such a huge sense of appreciation for one of Triumphs latest offerings.

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I would be the first to admit, often times I would point a first-time riders to the wrong type of bike to purchase. This is simply because, that is how most of us got into motorcycling, we would easily gravitate towards whichever type of bike our closest associates owned, usually a superbike or a cruiser.

Having had the privilege of testing a few naked bikes in recent months, I have officially become a strong advocate for newbie riders to start off on them fairingless bonnies. They’re often lighter, and extremely easy to handle. While most noticeable super-nakeds such as the Aprilia Tuono V4, KTM 1290 Super Duke and the recently launched Triumph Speed Triple 1200RS have steadily claimed top spots in the performance segment of motorcycling, it seems the Trident has already marked it’s territory on the entry level segment. Naked bikes have been overlooked by most motorcyclists for many years. Perhaps because, they didn’t carry the type of presence and stature which most superbikes and cruisers do. Times have changed, manufactures have made great efforts into making naked bikes look slick and beastly. As a result, naked bikes have started winning the hearts and minds of most motorcycle enthusiasts out there.

Triumph Motorcycles South Africa recently launched one of the most eagerly anticipated motorcycles in 2021, the all-new Trident 660. Now… to anyone born in the 80’s and thereafter, the name Trident would sound relatively new, but if you had to ask anyone who has been riding motorcycles since the era of Afros, Bell-Bottoms, Disco Music, and Elvis Presley, they would be quick to tell you that Triumph’s Trident was initially introduced in the 70’s, and actually managed to make a great name for itself. Solely because it had a few mechanical offerings which its closest competitors could not match.

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Fast forward to 2021, it seems history has once more repeated itself. Triumph Trident 660 still offers more tech and accessories compared to its rivals. In an era where motorcycles are becoming more powerful and pricey, Triumph jumped right on the opposite end, and came out with a product which offers great value for money, targeted at three categories of motorcyclists – First time younger riders, an older generation tempted by thoughts of trying out motorcycling for the first time, and experienced riders seeking an alternative motorcycle they could use for commuting.

The Trident 660 is one of the easiest motorcycles to ride. Once you throw your leg over the seat, you immediately become one with the bike as there are no intense mechanical configurations you would have to adapt to. Ergonomics are great, the bike handles superbly well, whereas gear shifting and acceleration is seamlessly smooth.

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The big challenge with entry level motorcycles is that of manufacturers are not putting enough effort in their design to make them look appealing to new riders. This statement obviously, doesn’t apply to the new Trident. It is a motorcycle that possesses extremely good looks for it’s class, yet doesn’t beg for attention. There’s just this certain mystique about it. We have become a society overly concerned with how we look, and highly conscious of the type of impression we put out. The Triumph 660 will do a great job in upholding your slick and stylish reputation. It’s the chassis, engine and overall finish that sets the Trident apart from its competitors.

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Triumph Trident 660 engine shares its DNA with the 2006 Daytona and 675 Street Triple 660s. The inline liquid cooled engine configuration has been resized and retuned resulting in a longer stroke with 90% of peak torque delivered right across the rev range. Peak power sits at about 81hp @10,250rpm and 64nm peak torque @ 6,250rpm. It comes standard with a slip and assist clutch with an option to throw in a quick shifter. It also features two riding modes, road and rain, including switchable traction control and ride by wire throttle. The 17inch aluminium spoke wheels are protected by Michelin Road 5 tyres. The seat height is only 805mm, accommodative to riders of various heights .

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 The multifunctional TFT display is round, old school and immaculate. Highly visible even in direct sunlight. If you feel like spicing up your options menu you may also add Bluetooth connectivity as an extra, which will then be integrated with the “My Triumph” electronics package suite. Your phone functions, GoPro and even turn-by-turn navigation can be integrated into the electronics package. Lighting is all LED all round with the front head light projected through a single round headlight. The Triumph logo on the petrol cap, brake light, engine cases and bar clamp gives it a more premium finish. It is the engine, chassis, ride safety electronics, price range and overall details in the finish that sets the Trident apart from its rivals.

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The suspension is safeguarded by Showa upside down forks and Showa preload adjustable monoshock RSU in the rear. Braking power is powered by Nissin on twin 310mm discs, supported by single pot caliper and 255mm in the rear. Wet weight sits at about 189kg making the Trident extremely agile and confidence inspiring. The 14L fuel tank is elegantly designed with Triumph’s signature cut-outs. There are only two departments where the Trident is out-classed by its closest rival, the Kawasaki Z650, that is in the brake department and fuel consumption.

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The 2021 Triumph Trident 660 retails for R150 000. This is a hard to beat price considering the amount of features it offers.

For more info, visit: Triumph Motorcycles | For the Ride (triumph-motorcycles.co.za)

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